Board and Commission Opportunities

Melrose has a number of boards and commissions, we would like to encourage more residents to consider volunteering to serve on them. Below is a partial list, along with information on the frequency of meetings and the total number of members for each body. If you are interested in serving on any of them, please e-mail us at volunteer@cityofmelrose.org, no later than March 18, with a statement of why you are interested. You may attach a resume if you like. 

Beebe Estate Board of Trustees
The Beebe Estate Board of Trustees is responsible for managing the historic Beebe Estate (235 West Foster Street), including upkeep and rental.
Meetings: The Board meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. in the Beebe Estate.
Membership: Seven members.

Board of Appeals
The Melrose Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) considers requests for variances, special permits and appeals from decisions of City Officials. 
Meetings: Typically on the second Wednesday of each month at 7:45pm. As needed, the board will also meet on the fourth Wednesday of each month. Meetings are in the City Council Chamber, City Hall.
Membership: Five members and two alternates; the members must include an attorney, an architect, and a builder or civil engineer.

Board of Assessors
The Board of Assessors determines the fair value of all real estate in the City of Melrose and sets the property tax rate. They also decide on requests for abatements.
Meetings: The Board meets on an as-needed basis (about six times per year), during business hours, in the Assessor’s office.
Membership: Three members.

Board of Health
Working with the Health Director, the Board of Health makes rules and sets policy regarding public health in the City of Melrose.
Meetings: The Board of Health typically meets once a month, in the evenings. 
Membership: Three members, one of whom must be a physician.

Commission on Women
The Melrose Commission on Women (“MCW”) works to study, understand, educate, and promote constructive action in areas of interest and concern to women and girls in the community.
Meetings: The Commission meets on the third Monday of each month at 7 p.m. in the Basement Conference Room, City Hall.
Membership: Nine members. The Commission is committed to diversity and seeks to improve the lives of women with diverse racial, ethnic, religious, age, sexual orientation, and socio- economic backgrounds.

Conservation Commission
The Conservation Commission administers the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, which protects watershed resources such as wetlands and floodplains; and issues permits for work in or near those resources.
Meetings: The Commission meets on the third Thursday of the month in the Cassidy Conference Room, City Hall.
Membership: Seven members. 

Council on Aging
The Council on Aging coordinates and implements programs designed to meet the needs of residents age 60 and over.
Meetings: The Council meets on the third Thursday of the month at 9:30 a.m. in the Milano Center, 201 West Foster St.
Membership: Five members, at least four of whom must be over the age of 60.

Historic District Commission
The Melrose Historic District Commission reviews all proposed architectural changes in the Downtown Historic District to preserve and protect the distinctive and significant characteristics of buildings and places; to maintain and improve the settings of those buildings and places; and to encourage new designs compatible with existing buildings in the district.
Meetings: The Commission meets on an as-needed basis. Meetings typically take place at 6:15 p.m. in the Cassidy Conference Room, City Hall.
Membership: Seven members and two alternates, including experts in architecture, real estate, history, and law.

Historical Commission
The historical commission preserves, protects, and develops the historical and archaeological assets of the City.
Meetings: The Commission meets on an as-needed basis, typically at 7:00 p.m. in the Cassidy Conference Room, City Hall.
Membership: Seven members, including experts in architecture, historic preservation and city planning.

Human Rights Commission
The Melrose Human Rights Commission provides a mechanism for resolving disputes among Melrose citizens that may involve an element of racial, religious, or ethnic prejudice, and develops programs for promoting a spirit of diversity and respect for others regardless of their differences.
Meetings: The Commission meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:00 p.m. in the Cassidy Conference Room, City Hall.
Membership: Eleven members. The Administrative Code states “The Commissioners shall, as far as it is practicable, be selected so as to ensure representation from those classes protected under state and federal law, including but not limited to race, color, religious creed, national origin, sex, age, disability, veteran status, ancestry, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, or public benefit status.”

Library Board of Trustees
The Board of Trustees represents to the City the interests, issues, and concerns of the library. The Board of Trustees establishes a written policy for the selection of library materials and the use of materials and facilities in accordance with the standards adopted by the American Library Association. 
Meetings: The Trustees meet on an as-needed basis, about six times a year, at 7:30 p.m. in the Trustees’ Room of the Melrose Public Library.
Membership: Six members.

Memorial Hall Board of Trustees
The Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Building Board of Trustees is responsible for managing Memorial Hall (590 Main Street), including upkeep and rental.
Meetings: Meetings are on the first Wednesday of the month at 6:00 p.m. in Memorial Hall.
Membership: Five members, at least two of whom must be veterans.

Park Commission
The Park Commission is responsible for managing the parks and playgrounds of Melrose, including Mount Hood.
Meetings: The Commission meets on the second Monday of the month at 7:00 p.m. in the function hall of Mount Hood Clubhouse.
Membership: Five members.

Planning Board
The Planning Board oversees new development and reviews applications for subdivisions, site plan approvals, and special permits for affordable housing, slope protection, and residential uses in non-residentially zoned areas. It also administers the Subdivision Control Law and adopts the Master Plan for the City. They also make recommendations on cases when the Zoning Board of Appeals is the Special Permit Granting Authority. The Board participates in the formulation and review of zoning changes and long-range planning projects. 
Meetings: Typically on the fourth Monday of each month at 7:45 p.m. in the Cassidy Conference Room, City Hall. Design Review, Zoning Subcommittee, special meetings and public hearings are scheduled on an as-needed basis.
Membership: Nine members, including experts in architecture, planning, engineering, energy and law.

Traffic Commission
The Traffic Commission considers and votes on regulatory traffic and parking issues such as proposed new parking restrictions, speed limit changes, modifications to roadway regulations (one way, stop signs, etc.), and associated regulatory signage.
Meetings: Quarterly, on the third Wednesday of March, June, September, and December, at 5:30 p.m. in the City Council Chamber, City Hall. 
Membership: Five residents, as well as the City Engineer, Chief of Police, and one member of the City Council.

Wyoming Cemetery Commission
The Wyoming Cemetery Commission oversees the management and maintenance of Wyoming Cemetery.
Meetings: The Commission meets once or twice a month, typically at 8:30 a.m. or 4:30 p.m., in the Wyoming Cemetery Conference Room.
Membership: Three members.